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Thread: How to remove scratches interior plastics?

  1. #1
    Large member Mr Milkman's Avatar
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    Default How to remove scratches interior plastics?

    Anyone have any technique, or know of any product that can remove scratches on the interior plastics? In the back of the gen 1 wagon I bought recently it of course has scratches and scuff marks, and I'm trying to figure out a way to get rid of them. I was thinking to give it a light sand, but as it's textured, it may end up making it looks worse by removing the surrounding texture...

    any ideas or suggestion would be helpful!

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Big Kahuna BIG POSTER BJM's Avatar
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    replace with less scratched plastic???
    Quote Originally Posted by Marty
    melted butter and a stack hat??? Not again - i'm still sore

  3. #3
    RSLC Wh0re BIG POSTER Rob's Avatar
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    take it to a plastics repairer
    Eagle Trim Repairs or Uticolour does all our work from where we have radio's/ phones etc mounted in vehicles
    Quote Originally Posted by rec01l
    Northern hemisphere engines rotated in the opposite direction, legacys included.
    This means they require an anti-timing belt and a different orientation on the water pump polariser

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    Advanced n00b whiteturbo's Avatar
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    I've had success in the past with an angle-grinder!

    Seriously, if the plastic has a textured finish, then you're screwed. Any repair work, particularly if the scratches are deep, will show against the non-scratched areas.

    Maybe you do need to sand back the scratches and lightly sand the rest of the area to match. Just try sanding a test spot somewhere out of sight first - I have seen some plastic trims that only have a veneer of "surface material" on them and any serious sanding has cut through this into the substrate - not nice.

    If there are a lot of scratches, and fairly deep, then following the advice of either of the previous two posts would be the way to go. If you're going to go with replacement trims, then have a go at the old scratched ones first because you have nothing to lose. If you're going to take it to a professional place, don't touch it (you could just make it worse or unrepairable).

    Good luck!
    1992 Shape Shifter: Gen 1, Series 1 front/Series 2 rear, all in glorious Mica Red/Black. Packed with WRX Sti goodies - last dyno 190kW ATW @ 15psi.

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  5. #5
    RSLC Wh0re BIG POSTER Rob's Avatar
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    also, i've has success with flattening scratches with a butane soldering iron and an "open flame" tip on it.
    you heat the area, re-shape with your finger/ screw-driver/ stiff brush (for texture)
    Quote Originally Posted by rec01l
    Northern hemisphere engines rotated in the opposite direction, legacys included.
    This means they require an anti-timing belt and a different orientation on the water pump polariser

  6. #6
    Large member Mr Milkman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob
    take it to a plastics repairer
    Eagle Trim Repairs or Uticolour does all our work from where we have radio's/ phones etc mounted in vehicles
    Uticolor look alright, but I'm on a tight budget at the moment.. so I'll try and sand it and have a play with it. It's pretty scratched up, so anything I do to it couldn't really make it much worse...

  7. #7
    Large member Mr Milkman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob
    also, i've has success with flattening scratches with a butane soldering iron and an "open flame" tip on it.
    you heat the area, re-shape with your finger/ screw-driver/ stiff brush (for texture)
    ah ok, Ill give that a go too. Not too much to loose considering how scratched it is...

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